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20110517

Akagu on the computer

8 comments:

  1. do you have the program up for download?

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  2. Hey blessing, I'm working on it. By the way, have you been able to do anything with the nsibidi from the author?

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  3. Oh I've learnt to write my name and can recognise a few basic characters. Though with my name I've been having issues with the "NG" (its " n' " with the latin conversion of my language Shona) and generally other sounds which are missing from my language. For the sake of compensating I've just decided to use the "a-z" equivalent Nsibidi fonts, which reduces complexity really.

    I'm enjoying this a lot and I'm even encouraging (sometimes forcibly)my little brother to learn it. Progress for me has been slow due to current semester coursework and exams deadlines. Anyway keep the good work, I'll be recommending this to a few friends who may want tattoos or names in Nsibidi(hopefully they'll make an effort to learn it)

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  4. Thanks blessing. The function of akagu is to act as an aid to nsibidi in the Igbo language. This set of characters is specifically for the Igbo language, any other languages that need to use will have to have the characters adjusted to their language (a new set). We already have the complex characters in the current Igbo Latin alphabet (search it) so there are many characters because Igbo tones and phonemes are so complex and reading individual sounds can be hard (such as 'nwa' which is actually one syllable).

    Thanks for promoting the project. I have also been busy and I plan on coming back to the thread shortly. I would hold off on any tattoos or any other permanent things for now because I think the project is still at its infant stage. What do you think?

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  5. I think its going great and also when looking at Igbo I saw how it dealt with complex sounds differently from my language which relys on using more composites instead of adding extra characters. Plus a lot of the similarities in sound (between igbo and shona) can be attributed to the fact my ancestors (Niger Congo Bantu) were in Nigeria 2000 years ago.

    But on the infancy point, what level of infancy is the project at? I mean this with regards to completing the 500 most common characters (I'm aware there thousands of characters). Or setting some fundamental rules like whether the 107 radicals are going to be a gateway to all characters/words.

    Plus also, when I looked at Chinese character formations I saw their characters were formed with both meaning and sound signifiers; which is how they help ease literacy. This left me wondering about how Nsibidi would do the same.
    Would using akagu mixed with a Nsibidi character (as seen below) be an equivalent system to make Nsibidi easier to learn?



    < Lieutenant>...

    For cats

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  6. .... [Nsibidi character] [akagu description]
    [Dike (warrior)][infantry]
    [Dike (warrior)][ Lieutenant]...

    For cats
    [X](leopard, no akagu for this)
    [X][lion]
    [X][tiger]
    [X][cheetah]

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  7. Yes, the infacny I'm talking about is developing the most common characters, I have created around 1/4. Its infancy is also because of the research that has gone into the characters, so far only secondary research has gone into it, I wish to go and check these characters (well, the readicals) with people who have learnt nsibidi from their ancestors.

    The akagu script was made to make writing easier. Many (not all) of the words the nsibidi characters represent can be guessed by looking at what other characters make them up, like restaurant which is made up of mainly 'food and house', but they don't necessarily have a sound signifier.

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  8. I'm guessing that you are going to need some donations for the project since your trip might be too expensive finance wise. I thought that setting a donation fund could help the project. However with the whole Nigerian mistrust (419 scams) people have, it could prove rather difficult. But do you have any plans for finance if its personally too expensive for you.

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This blog is about African writing, the nsibidi script. This website include many nsibidi symbols meaning a lot of different things. All images do not hold a copyright unless indicated so. You can copy, distribute, and sell any information/images you find on this website. Public Domain.